Goodreads Monday | July 13

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme started by Lauren’s Page Turners. You select a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it. Whether it’s a book photo or description (or both!), share why you love them! You can find Lauren’s Page Turners’ link here.


This Week’s Post

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

I ordered ‘The Vanishing Half’ through Book of the Month in June. I’ve heard many wonderful things about this story of sisters with divided lives. I can’t wait to get to this book!


Synopsis

From The New York Times -bestselling author of The Mothers , a stunning new novel about twin sisters, inseparable as children, who ultimately choose to live in two very different worlds, one black and one white.

The Vignes twin sisters will always be identical. But after growing up together in a small, southern black community and running away at age sixteen, it’s not just the shape of their daily lives that is different as adults, it’s everything: their families, their communities, their racial identities. Ten years later, one sister lives with her black daughter in the same southern town she once tried to escape. The other secretly passes for white, and her white husband knows nothing of her past. Still, even separated by so many miles and just as many lies, the fates of the twins remain intertwined. What will happen to the next generation, when their own daughters’ storylines intersect?

Weaving together multiple strands and generations of this family, from the Deep South to California, from the 1950s to the 1990s, Brit Bennett produces a story that is at once a riveting, emotional family story and a brilliant exploration of the American history of passing. Looking well beyond issues of race, The Vanishing Half considers the lasting influence of the past as it shapes a person’s decisions, desires, and expectations, and explores some of the multiple reasons and realms in which people sometimes feel pulled to live as something other than their origins.

As with her New York Times-bestselling debut The Mothers, Brit Bennett offers an engrossing page-turner about family and relationships that is immersive and provocative, compassionate and wise.


Are you excited to read The Vanishing Half? I know that I can’t wait to read this!


Love and Light, Cathleen

Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday | Jul 6

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme started by Lauren’s Page Turners. You select a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it. Whether it’s a book photo or description (or both!), share why you love them! You can find Lauren’s Page Turners’ link here.


This Week’s Post

Goodreads Monday post. 
'Sal & Gabi Break the Universe by Carlos Hernandez
Link: https://i1.wp.com/i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1536087897l/36595887._SY475_.jpg?w=620&ssl=1

Sal & Gabi Break the Universe by Carlos Hernandez

I purchased Sal & Gabi Breaks the Universe a couple weeks ago, and I’m soo excited! This is a middle grade story featuring Latinx main characters on an adventure!


Synopsis

How did a raw chicken get inside Yasmany’s locker?

When Sal Vidon meets Gabi Real for the first time, it isn’t under the best of circumstances. Sal is in the principal’s office for the third time in three days, and it’s still the first week of school. Gabi, student council president and editor of the school paper, is there to support her friend Yasmany, who just picked a fight with Sal. She is determined to prove that somehow, Sal planted a raw chicken in Yasmany’s locker, even though nobody saw him do it and the bloody poultry has since mysteriously disappeared.

Sal prides himself on being an excellent magician, but for this sleight of hand, he relied on a talent no one would guess . . . except maybe Gabi, whose sharp eyes never miss a trick. When Gabi learns that he’s capable of conjuring things much bigger than a chicken–including his dead mother–and she takes it all in stride, Sal knows that she is someone he can work with. There’s only one slight problem: their manipulation of time and space could put the entire universe at risk.

A sassy entropy sweeper, a documentary about wedgies, a principal who wears a Venetian bauta mask, and heaping platefuls of Cuban food are just some of the delights that await in this mind-blowing novel gift-wrapped in love and laughter.



Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: June 29

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme started by Lauren’s Page Turners. You select a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it. Whether it’s a book photo or description (or both!), share why you love them! You can find Lauren’s Page Turners’ link here.


This Week’s Post

'More to the Story' is on my Goodreads TBR. 
Four girls lay on a tri-colored blanket. One of the girls is holding a smart phone. Another girl is holding a book. 'More to the Story' is written in script font, at the top of the image.

More to the Story by Hena Khan

More to the Story is a Middle Grade retelling of Little Women. I’m going to love this story as much as the original classic!

Synopsis

From the critically acclaimed author of Amina’s Voice comes a new story inspired by Louisa May Alcott’s beloved classic, Little Women, featuring four sisters from a modern American Muslim family living in Georgia.

When Jameela Mirza is picked to be feature editor of her middle school newspaper, she’s one step closer to being an award-winning journalist like her late grandfather. The problem is her editor-in-chief keeps shooting down her article ideas. Jameela’s assigned to write about the new boy in school, who has a cool British accent but doesn’t share much, and wonders how she’ll make his story gripping enough to enter into a national media contest.

Jameela, along with her three sisters, is devastated when their father needs to take a job overseas, away from their cozy Georgia home for six months. Missing him makes Jameela determined to write an epic article—one to make her dad extra proud. But when her younger sister gets seriously ill, Jameela’s world turns upside down. And as her hunger for fame looks like it might cost her a blossoming friendship, Jameela questions what matters most, and whether she’s cut out to be a journalist at all…


Would you put More to the Story on your TBR? Feel free to share in the comments!


'Love and Light, Cathleen' written in pink script, set on a light pink background.

Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: June 22

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post

When Life Gives You Mangoes by Kereen Getten
Release Date: September 15, 2020

I’m so glad that I received When Life Gives You Mangoes through NetGalley! This is a story about friendship, community and rebuilding life after a natural disaster hits. I can’t wait to read it!

Synopsis

For fans of deeply poignant middle grade about friendship and loss like The Thing About Jellyfish, comes the story about a young girl who can’t remember anything from her previous summer after a hurricane.

Twelve-year-old Clara lives on an island that visitors call exotic. But there’s nothing exotic about it to Clara. She loves eating ripe mangos off the ground, running outside in the rain with her Papa during rainy season, and going to her secret hideout with Gaynah–even though lately she’s not acting like a best friend.

The only thing out of the ordinary for Clara is that something happened to her memory that made her forget everything that happened last summer after a hurricane hit. Sometimes things come back to her in drips like a tap that hasn’t been turned off properly. Other times her Mama fills in the blanks…only she knows those aren’t her memories and it is hard feeling like she is not like everybody else.

But this summer is going to be different for Clara. Everyone is buzzing with excitement over a new girl in the village who is not like other visitors. She is about to make big waves on the island–and give Clara a summer she won’t forget.


What are your thoughts on When Life Gives You Mangoes? Do you think you’ll add this on your TBR?



Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: June 15

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post

The Bookish Life of Nina Hill by Abbi Waxman

I finally have a copy of The Bookish Life of Nina Hill, thanks to my husband gifting me a copy! I relate so much to Nina’s reserved, reclusive nature. I look forward to reading this story sometime in the summer!

Synopsis

The only child of a single mother, Nina has her life just as she wants it: a job in a bookstore, a kick-butt trivia team, a world-class planner and a cat named Phil. If she sometimes suspects there might be more to life than reading, she just shrugs and picks up a new book.

When the father Nina never knew existed suddenly dies, leaving behind innumerable sisters, brothers, nieces, and nephews, Nina is horrified. They all live close by! They’re all—or mostly all—excited to meet her! She’ll have to Speak. To. Strangers. It’s a disaster! And as if that wasn’t enough, Tom, her trivia nemesis, has turned out to be cute, funny, and deeply interested in getting to know her. Doesn’t he realize what a terrible idea that is?

Nina considers her options.

1. Completely change her name and appearance. (Too drastic, plus she likes her hair.)
2. Flee to a deserted island. (Hard pass, see: coffee).
3. Hide in a corner of her apartment and rock back and forth. (Already doing it.)


It’s time for Nina to come out of her comfortable shell, but she isn’t convinced real life could ever live up to fiction. It’s going to take a brand-new family, a persistent suitor, and the combined effects of ice cream and trivia to make her turn her own fresh page.

What are your thoughts on The Bookish Life of Nina Hill? Would you add this to your growing book list? Feel free to share!

Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: June 8

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post

I Hope You Get This Message by Farah Naz Rishi

I received this book through OwlCrate a few months ago. I love the plot of the story, and I hope to read it very soon! It kinda reminds me of a pandemic scenario, but I’m still open to reading these kinds of books!

Synopsis

Seven days. Seven days. The Earth might end in seven days.

When news stations start reporting that Earth has been contacted by a planet named Alma, the world is abuzz with rumors that the alien entity is giving mankind only few days to live before they hit the kill switch on civilization.

For high school truant Jesse Hewitt, though, nothing has ever felt permanent. Not the guys he hooks up with. Not the jobs his underpaid mom works so hard to hold down. Life has dealt him one bad blow after another — so what does it matter if it all ends now? Cate Collins, on the other hand, is desperate to use this time to find the father she’s never met, the man she grew up hearing wild stories about, most of which she didn’t believe. And then there’s Adeem Khan. While coding and computer programming have always come easily to him, forgiveness doesn’t. He can’t seem to forgive his sister for leaving, even though it’s his last chance.

With only seven days to face their truths and right their wrongs, Jesse, Cate, and Adeem’s paths collide even as their worlds are pulled apart.

What do you think of ‘I Hope You Get This Message’? Would you put this on your TBR? Feel free to share!

Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: June 1

I’m taking part in Goodreads Monday. This was started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post

Towers Falling by Jewell Parker Rhodes

I first came across this book a couple years ago at a bookshop, and I finally have it home (thank you Andy)! I can’t wait to read this middle grade story about discovering the facts about such a harrowing day in US history.

Synopsis

From award-winning author Jewell Parker Rhodes, a powerful novel set fifteen years after the 9/11 attacks.

When her fifth-grade teacher hints that a series of lessons about home and community will culminate with one big answer about two tall towers once visible outside their classroom window, Deja can’t help but feel confused. She sets off on a journey of discovery, with new friends Ben and Sabeen by her side. But just as she gets closer to answering big questions about who she is, what America means, and how communities can grow (and heal), she uncovers new questions, too. Like, why does Pop get so angry when she brings up anything about the towers?

Award-winning author Jewell Parker Rhodes tells a powerful story about young people who weren’t alive to witness this defining moment in history, but begin to realize how much it colors their every day.

What do you think of Towers Falling? Would you put it on your TBR list?

Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: May 25

I’m taking part in Goodreads Monday. This was started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post:

When Reason Breaks by Cindy L. Rodriguez

I received this on my Kindle a while ago, but since I let too many things occupy my mind, I never got around to reading it! I hope to get to reading this moving story soon!

Synopsis

13 Reasons Why meets the poetry of Emily Dickinson in this gripping debut novel perfect for fans of Sara Zarr or Jennifer Brown.

A Goth girl with an attitude problem, Elizabeth Davis must learn to control her anger before it destroys her. Emily Delgado appears to be a smart, sweet girl, with a normal life, but as depression clutches at her, she struggles to feel normal. Both girls are in Ms. Diaz’s English class, where they connect to the words of Emily Dickinson. Both are hovering on the edge of an emotional precipice. One of them will attempt suicide. And with Dickinson’s poetry as their guide, both girls must conquer their personal demons to ever be happy.

In an emotionally taut novel with a richly diverse cast of characters, readers will relish in the poetry of Emily Dickinson and be completely swept up in the turmoil of two girls grappling with demons beyond their control.

Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: May 18

I’m taking part in Goodreads Monday. This was started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post:

The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

I’ve wanted to read this story for a while, like many other books on my TBR! I love stories centering around poeple tied to one culture while struggling to adapt to another. Hopefully I can make time in the summer to read this!


Synopsis

Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies established this young writer as one the most brilliant of her generation. Her stories are one of the very few debut works — and only a handful of collections — to have won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Among the many other awards and honors it received were the New Yorker Debut of the Year award, the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the highest critical praise for its grace, acuity, and compassion in detailing lives transported from India to America.

In The Namesake, Lahiri enriches the themes that made her collection an international bestseller: the immigrant experience, the clash of cultures, the conflicts of assimilation, and, most poignantly, the tangled ties between generations. Here again Lahiri displays her deft touch for the perfect detail — the fleeting moment, the turn of phrase — that opens whole worlds of emotion.

The Namesake takes the Ganguli family from their tradition-bound life in Calcutta through their fraught transformation into Americans. On the heels of their arranged wedding, Ashoke and Ashima Ganguli settle together in Cambridge, Massachusetts. An engineer by training, Ashoke adapts far less warily than his wife, who resists all things American and pines for her family. When their son is born, the task of naming him betrays the vexed results of bringing old ways to the new world. Named for a Russian writer by his Indian parents in memory of a catastrophe years before, Gogol Ganguli knows only that he suffers the burden of his heritage as well as his odd, antic name.

Lahiri brings great empathy to Gogol as he stumbles along the first-generation path, strewn with conflicting loyalties, comic detours, and wrenching love affairs. With penetrating insight, she reveals not only the defining power of the names and expectations bestowed upon us by our parents, but also the means by which we slowly, sometimes painfully, come to define ourselves.

What do you think about The Namesake? Have you read this book?

Connect With Me:

Goodreads Monday: May 11

I’m taking part in Goodreads Monday. This was started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post

All the Days Past, All the Days to Come by Mildred D. Taylor

Why I Want to Read It:

I came across this book a couple months ago, and I was excited that this is a continuation of Cassie Logan’s story! I remember reading Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry when I was younger, and I loved it!

Synopsis

The saga of the Logan family–made famous in the Newbery Medal-winning Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry–concludes in a long-awaited and deeply fulfilling story.

In her tenth book, Mildred Taylor completes her sweeping saga about the Logan family of Mississippi, which is also the story of the civil rights movement in America of the 20th century. Cassie Logan, first met in Song of the Trees and Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, is a young woman now, searching for her place in the world, a journey that takes her from Toledo to California, to law school in Boston, and, ultimately, in the 60s, home to Mississippi to participate in voter registration. She is witness to the now-historic events of the century: the Great Migration north, the rise of the civil rights movement, preceded and precipitated by the racist society of America, and the often violent confrontations that brought about change. Rich, compelling storytelling is Ms. Taylor’s hallmark, and she fulfills expectations as she brings to a close the stirring family story that has absorbed her for over forty years. It is a story she was born to tell.




Connect With Me: