Non-Fiction Stories | Waiting on Wednesday

Sometimes Non-Fiction stories are my go-to reads! Whether you wish to learn about current events or self-help material, these books are available! For this week’s Waiting on Wednesday, I came across a moving book relevant to these challenging times!

Waiting On Wednesday is a weekly meme that first originated with Jill at Breaking the Spine. It has now linked up with Tressa at Wishful Endings (under Can’t Wait Wednesday). You can view Tressa’s post here.

This Week’s Non-Fiction Pick

Moving Non-Fiction Alone Together: Love, Grief and Comfort in the Time of COVID 19; Edited by Jennifer Haupt Link: https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1592453456l/53342241.jpg

Alone Together: Love, Grief and Comfort In the Time of COVID 19; Edited by Jennifer Haupt

Alone Together is both thorough and emotional! Despite the difficult situation of the pandemic, poets and writers create a beautiful compilation. It details the challenges Americans face, as well as the strength communities hold when reaching out.

Synopsis

ALONE TOGETHER: Love, Grief, and Comfort During the Time of COVID-19 is a collection of essays, poems, and interviews. It serves as a lifeline for negotiating how to connect and thrive during this stressful time of isolation. It also provides historical perspective that will remain relevant for years to come. All contributing authors and business partners are donating their share to The Book Industry Charitable Foundation, a nonprofit organization that coordinates charitable programs to strengthen the bookselling community.

Furthermore, ALONE TOGETHER is divided into five sections: What Now?, Grieve, Comfort, Connect, And Don’t Stop. The overarching theme is how this age of isolation and uncertainty is changing us as individuals and a society.

Finally, Let’s Chat About Non-Fiction!

Do you like reading Non-Fiction? If so, what books are you waiting for release?

Feel free to Contact Me!

Doylestown Saturday Trip, and Meeting Toi Derricotte

I hope everyone is having a good week so far!

Last weekend I had a fun trip to Doylestown Bookshop! Andy and I decided to make Saturday a ‘bookish excursion’, since we were also attending a poetry reading in Frenchtown that evening.

Photo is from The Doylestown Bookshop site

It’s been a couple weeks since I last visited Doylestown, so when we arrived I enjoyed browsing all the books! I admire the wide selection of diverse titles that’s always available. The selection rivals that of the Bank Street Bookstore in New York City, which also a diverse selection of reading material tailored to both patrons and teachers.

I picked up a couple interesting reads at Doylestown!

Girls in the Front by Sara Marcus is a tell-all featuring the rise of the Riot Grrrl movement in the 90s. Skimming through the book brought back so many memories of my grunge-fanatic days back in high school!

I also picked up a light read, No Judgments by Meg Cabot. This is a Contemporary Romance that involves a young woman that moves to Key West and tries to reinvent herself by running an animal rescue service.

Later that evening, Andy and I traveled to ArtYard in Frenchtown, NJ to see Toi Derricotte present a poetry reading from her recent poetry collection “i”: New and Selected Poems. Toi Derricotte is a writing professor from the University of Pittsburgh and co-founded the Cave Canem foundation. She’s also a finalist for the National Book Award (we will all find out the winner on November 20). I couldn’t wait to see an experienced poet displaying her art. I also recall seeing a Cave Canem performance in Newark a few years ago and loving it!

Toi Derricotte gave an amazing poetry presentation. The stories she shared about her early life as a young mother truly touched my heart. After the performance, I purchased a copy of Derricotte’s book and had it signed. As nervous as I was about having my copy signed, I felt determined to meet her and compliment her amazing poetry. Toi Derricotte was very sweet, and she made sure that my name was spelled correctly. I’m so happy that I met her, and I hope that she wins the National Book Award!

That’s it for now! I hope everyone is having a great Wednesday!

Goodreads Monday: November 4

Good morning all! It’s almost 7am on Monday where I’m at, and I hope everyone’s week is off to a good start!

For this post, I’m taking part in Goodreads Monday. This was started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This week’s post:

Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America and America in Iran by Azadeh Moaveni
Synopsis:
As far back as she can remember, Azadeh Moaveni has felt at odds with her tangled identity as an Iranian-American. In suburban America, Azadeh lived in two worlds. At home, she was the daughter of the Iranian exile community, serving tea, clinging to tradition, and dreaming of Tehran. Outside, she was a California girl who practiced yoga and listened to Madonna. For years, she ignored the tense standoff between her two cultures. But college magnified the clash between Iran and America, and after graduating, she moved to Iran as a journalist. This is the story of her search for identity, between two cultures cleaved apart by a violent history. It is also the story of Iran, a restive land lost in the twilight of its revolution.
Moaveni’s homecoming falls in the heady days of the country’s reform movement, when young people demonstrated in the streets and shouted for the Islamic regime to end. In these tumultuous times, she struggles to build a life in a dark country, wholly unlike the luminous, saffron and turquoise-tinted Iran of her imagination. As she leads us through the drug-soaked, underground parties of Tehran, into the hedonistic lives of young people desperate for change, Moaveni paints a rare portrait of Iran’s rebellious next generation. The landscape of her Tehran — ski slopes, fashion shows, malls and cafes — is populated by a cast of young people whose exuberance and despair brings the modern reality of Iran to vivid life.

Why I Want To Read It:
I’m always fascinated about all areas of history, featuring women making a life for themselves. There are many areas around the world with untold stories just waiting for us to discover!