‘Get A Life, Chloe Brown’ by Talia Hibbert/A Review

Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert
Publisher: Avon Books
Length: 368 pages
Genre: Contemporary/Romance
Purchased through Book of the Month
Release Date: November 5, 2019

Synopsis:

Chloe Brown is a chronically ill computer geek with a goal, a plan, and a list. After almost but not quite dying, shes come up with seven directives to help her Get a Life, and shes already completed the first: finally moving out of her glamorous family’s mansion. The next items?

• Enjoy a drunken night out.
• Ride a motorcycle.
• Go camping.
• Have meaningless but thoroughly enjoyable sex.
• Travel the world with nothing but hand luggage.
• And… do something bad.


But it’s not easy being bad, even when you’ve written step-by-step guidelines on how to do it correctly. What Chloe needs is a teacher, and she knows just the man for the job.

Redford ‘Red’ Morgan is a handyman with tattoos, a motorcycle, and more sex appeal than ten-thousand Hollywood heartthrobs. He’s also an artist who paints at night and hides his work in the light of day, which Chloe knows because she spies on him occasionally. Just the teeniest, tiniest bit.

But when she enlists Red in her mission to rebel, she learns things about him that no spy session could teach her. Like why he clearly resents Chloe’s wealthy background. And why he never shows his art to anyone. And what really lies beneath his rough exterior…


My Thoughts:

There are so many reasons why I enjoyed Get a Life, Chloe Brown! Now, I normally enjoy many of the books I read (It’s hard for me to find anything distasteful about reading!), but there are special reasons why I particularly enjoyed this novel.

For one thing, Talia Hibbert covers the journey of emotional healing wonderfully! Both Chloe and Red are traveling their own journeys to recovery. Chloe is attempting to heal after fibromyalgia severely effected her social life, while Red is trying to resurrect his art career after personal setbacks flawed his journey. The experiences between Chloe and Red is the perfect ‘hate-to-love’ trope, as each feel strong feelings toward the other, yet the past colors their perceptions into frequent ‘worst case scenarios’. Their road is very steamy (there are plenty of ‘sexy-time’ scenes in the book!) yet their emotions are put to the test frequently, and it was a joy to read.

There is a healthy amount of diverse representation in the book as well! Chloe and her family are African-American, and they take a leading role in the novel. Chloe makes many moves to live independently (moving to her own apartment, self-employed), not letting medical conditions deter her path.

The banter between all of the characters in the book is very humorous! Talia Hibbert brings Chloe and her family to life with their constant quips and sarcastic remarks that reflect immense love!

‘Get a Life, Chloe Brown’ was such an enjoyable book to read! If you’re looking a story rich in diversity and romance, while navigating emotional relationships, then you will really love this story!

Rating: 5/5 Stars

March 2020 Reading Wrap-Up

March has been such a chaotic month, to say the least! Here in the US, what began as a month to prepare for St. Patrick’s Day activities and friends’ birthdays shifted into a period of Coronavirus dangers and social isolation. We don’t know how long this danger will last. What I do know is that reading is always (and continues to be) my mainstay for healing!

I read 5 books during the month of March:
Genres (books may fall into more than one category):
Mystery: 2
Contemporary: 1
Historical Fiction: 3
Romance: 3

We Ride Upon Sticks by Quan Barry (4 Stars)
Thank you Pantheon Books for sending me an ARC of We Ride Upon Sticks! I enjoyed the throwbacks to the 80s as a female hockey team enlisted the help of supernatural powers to succeed!

The A.I. Who Loved Me by Alyssa Cole (4.5 Stars)
I purchased The A.I. Who Loved Me through Audible. It was a lighthearted, sexy read! I loved that the story held a diverse cast of characters!

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens (4 Stars)
Where the Crawdads Sing was supposed to be a book club selection for March, but my library closed a couple days before the meeting due to the coronavirus. I loved that I got the opportunity to read the story though! While I wasn’t blown away, I deeply appreciated the North Carolina marshland depictions!

Out of the Embers by Amanda Cabot (4 Stars)
Thank you to Revell for sending me a copy of Out of the Embers! I loved this suspenseful-yet-sweet story of Texas in the 1850s!

Berried in the Past by Peg Cochran (5 Stars)
Thank you NetGalley for the eARC of Berried of the Past! I loved this cozy mystery set in a small Michigan town. The recipes given were also very yummy!

The Two Lives of Lydia Bird by Josie Silver (5 Stars)
The Two Lives of Lydia Bird is equal parts romantic and emotional! Lydia struggles to live life without her fiance while experiencing another ‘life’ with him!

Those were the books I read during March! How about you?

Goodreads Monday: March 23

I’m taking part in Goodreads Monday. This was started by Lauren’s Page Turners, in which you choose a book listed on your Goodreads TBR and talk about it.

This Week’s Post:

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory

Synopsis:
Agreeing to go to a wedding with a guy she gets stuck with in an elevator is something Alexa Monroe wouldn’t normally do. But there’s something about Drew Nichols that’s too hard to resist.

On the eve of his ex’s wedding festivities, Drew is minus a plus one. Until a power outage strands him with the perfect candidate for a fake girlfriend…


After Alexa and Drew have more fun than they ever thought possible, Drew has to fly back to Los Angeles and his job as a pediatric surgeon, and Alexa heads home to Berkeley, where she’s the mayor’s chief of staff. Too bad they can’t stop thinking about the other…

They’re just two high-powered professionals on a collision course toward the long distance dating disaster of the century–or closing the gap between what they think they need and what they truly want…

Why I Want to Read It:
I’ve recently gotten into reading books outside of my favorite genre. I’m naturally drawn toward Historical Fiction and Fantasy, but I’m beginning to branch out towards Contemporary stories. I came across this title while I was planning my wedding last year, so I placed this on my TBR list. I’ve yet to read it, but since I now own the book, I plan on doing so!

Book Review: ‘The Other People’ by C.J. Tudor

‘The Other People’ by C.J. Tudor
Length: 327 pages
Genre: Thriller
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Series: No
Release Date: January 28, 2020

Synopsis:
Driving home one night, stuck behind a rusty old car, Gabe sees a little girl’s face appear in the rear window. She mouths one word: ‘Daddy.’ It’s his five-year-old daughter, Izzy.

He never sees her again.

Three years later, Gabe spends his days and nights traveling up and down the motorway, searching for the car that took his daughter, refusing to give up hope, even though most people believe that Izzy is dead.

Fran and her daughter, Alice, also put in a lot of miles on the motorway. Not searching. But running. Trying to keep one step ahead of the people who want to hurt them. Because Fran knows the truth. She knows what really happened to Gabe’s daughter.

Then, the car that Gabe saw driving away that night is found, in a lake, with a body inside and Gabe is forced to confront events, not just from the night his daughter disappeared, but from far deeper in his past.

His search leads him to a group called The Other People.

If you have lost a loved one, The Other People want to help. Because they know what loss is like. They know what pain is like. They know what death is like.

There’s just one problem . . . they want other people to know it too.

My Thoughts:
I read ‘The Other People‘ as part of the Literally Dead Book Club‘s February selection. This is a book club that follows Thriller and Horror listings, so I was immediately drawn to the selection listed!

As I was reading The Other People, I loved how C.J. Tudor drew me in to the characters. Each person listed has some form of flaw in character. They’ve endured some form of horror in their lives, and want vengeance in some degree. Gabe is a man who wants revenge for the disappearance of his wife and daughter, yet he also has a dark past of his own. His connection with Fran and Alice (other central characters in the book) seems like random strangers fighting their personal struggles, yet as the layers are peeled back, Fran has a deep-seeded secret of her own.

I also loved finding out details of ‘The Other People’ as Gabe’s search for his lost daughter intensifies. Their presence within the dark web–and their backstory–adds a chilling factor to the tale. Gabe’s reluctance in delving into The Other People is overshadowed by his need to find his daughter Izzy, and the deeper he searches, the more shocking secrets he uncovers. The reveal towards the end of the story was a bit unexpected, but I appreciated the surprise!

The Other People was a fun read filled with chilling moments. If you like stories with a Black Mirror edge to it, then this would be the book for you!

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

WWW Wednesday: March 18

WWW Wednesday was originally hosted by A Daily Rhythm, and now maintained by Taking on a World of Words.

There are three prompts for WWW Wednesday:
–What are you currently reading?
–What did you finish recently reading?
–What do you think you’ll read next?

Out of the Embers by Amanda Cabot
Thank you Revell Reads for giving me a copy of Out of the Embers! It’s a Historical Romance tale set in Texas, during the 1800s.

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
I wasn’t completely blown away with the story as a whole, but I enjoyed the story of Kya discovering her humanity in the marshlands of North Carolina. I’m glad my local library suggested this book for their March Book Club pick! Although the meeting is postponed, I look forward to discussing it with group members in the future.

You Are Not Alone by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
You Are Not Alone is April’s pick for the Literally Dead Book Club. I received this story through Book of the Month, and I can’t wait to start it!

Reading Blog: Crawdads and Admiring Nature

Today I made good headway in reading ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’. I was supposed to read this for my book club meeting this week, but a notice came out today that due to the Coronavirus outbreak, the Hunterdon County libraries will be closed until the end of the month. I’ll definitely have time to finish the story between now and the next meeting! So far, I love how the story alternates between a murder mystery and describing the life of a young girl living in the marshlands of North Carolina.

Aside from reading, I made myself busy around the house (the usual cleaning and laundry, tending my plants). I also went outside briefly to appreciate nature. While I was outside, I admired viewing the daffodils and the budding trees in the front yard. I love being surrounded by the signs of Spring!

In this period of uncertainty and social distancing, it’s important for us to stay connected with one another. Wishing a smooth, minimally-stressful time for everyone!

WWW Wednesday: March 11

WWW Wednesday was originally hosted by A Daily Rhythm, and now maintained by Taking on a World of Words.

There are three prompts for WWW Wednesday:
–What are you currently reading?
–What did you finish recently reading?
–What do you think you’ll read next?

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
I’m reading Where the Crawdads Sing for my local library’s book club. So far I’m about 10% through. I’m really liking Kya’s backstory!

The A.I. Who Loved Me by Alyssa Cole
I had fun reading this quick story! I loved the fact that it features diverse characters, with a strong Black woman as the focal point in the plot.

Out of the Embers by Amanda Cabot
I received a complimentary copy of Out of the Embers as part of Revell Reads blogger list. So far I’ve received some interesting titles from Revell, so I can’t wait to start reading this one!

February 26, 2019: Some March Book Releases

I can’t believe that February is almost behind us! As much as I feel that time is passing by quickly (since I’m in wedding planning mode, it will be that special time before I know it!), I’m also excited for Springtime and new book releases. Here are a few titles I’ve come across in my search.

**I came across all titles mentioned on the Penguin Random House website**

Coming out on March 19

The Punishment She Deserves by Elizabeth George

Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers and Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley are forced to confront the past as they try to solve a crime that threatens to tear apart the very fabric of a quiet, historic medieval town in England.

The cozy, bucolic town of Ludlow is stunned when one of its most revered and respected citizens–Ian Druitt, the local deacon–is accused of a serious crime. Then, while in police custody, Ian is found dead. Did he kill himself? Or was he murdered?

When Barbara Havers is sent to Ludlow to investigate the chain of events that led to Ian’s death, all the evidence points to suicide. But Barbara can’t shake the feeling that she’s missing something. She decides to take a closer look at the seemingly ordinary inhabitants of Ludlow–mainly elderly retirees and college students–and discovers that almost everyone in town has something to hide…

Coming out on March 5

Daisy Jones and The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Everyone knows DAISY JONES & THE SIX, but nobody knows the reason behind their split at the absolute height of their popularity . . . until now.

Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars, and dreaming of singing at the Whisky a Go Go. The sex and drugs are thrilling, but it’s the rock ’n’ roll she loves most. By the time she’s twenty, her voice is getting noticed, and she has the kind of heedless beauty that makes people do crazy things.

Also getting noticed is The Six, a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant, and with the pressure of impending fatherhood and fame, Billy goes a little wild on the road.

Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer realizes that the key to supercharged success is to put the two together. What happens next will become the stuff of legend…

Coming out March 5

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian meets Jane the Virgin in this poignant but often laugh-out-loud funny contemporary YA about losing a sister and finding yourself amid the pressures, expectations, and stereotypes of growing up in a Mexican American home. 

Perfect Mexican daughters do not go away to college. And they do not move out of their parents’ house after high school graduation. Perfect Mexican daughters never abandon their family.
 
But Julia is not your perfect Mexican daughter. That was Olga’s role.
 
Then a tragic accident on the busiest street in Chicago leaves Olga dead and Julia left behind to reassemble the shattered pieces of her family. And no one seems to acknowledge that Julia is broken, too. Instead, her mother seems to channel her grief into pointing out every possible way Julia has failed.
 
But it’s not long before Julia discovers that Olga might not have been as perfect as everyone thought. With the help of her best friend, Lorena, and her first love (first everything), Connor, Julia is determined to find out. Was Olga really what she seemed? Or was there more to her sister’s story? And either way, how can Julia even attempt to live up to a seemingly impossible ideal?

Coming out on March 12

Shout by Laurie Halse Anderson

Bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson is known for the unflinching way she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Now, inspired by her fans and enraged by how little in our culture has changed since her groundbreaking novel Speak was first published twenty years ago, she has written a poetry memoir that is as vulnerable as it is rallying, as timely as it is timeless. In free verse, Anderson shares reflections, rants, and calls to action woven between deeply personal stories from her life that she’s never written about before. Searing and soul-searching, this important memoir is a denouncement of our society’s failures and a love letter to all the people with the courage to say #MeToo and #TimesUp, whether aloud, online, or only in their own hearts. Shout speaks truth to power in a loud, clear voice– and once you hear it, it is impossible to ignore.