Reading Rush Wrap-Up

During The Reading Rush, my goal was to read 4 books:
–The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane
–Small Country
–The Tea Dragon Society
–Sorcery of Thorns

I will list each book below and which challenges I fulfilled:

For the challenge ‘Read a book with at least 5 words on the cover’:
The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See. I found this story to be very touching and heartwarming. I’m currently on page 195 on this book. I love the historical facts that Lisa See weaves into her tale as she describes Li-Yan’s complicated life journey in China.

For the challenges ‘Read a book you meant to read last year’ and ‘Read an author’s debut novel’:
Small Country by Gael Faye. This was the first book I read during The Reading Rush. It was a tragic story detailing the life of Gaby, a 10 year old boy living in an expatriate community in Burundi. I loved every page of this riveting tale!

For the challenges ‘Read a book with a non-human main character’ and ‘Read a book in the same spot the entire time’
The Tea Dragon Society by Katie O’Neill. This is a graphic novel that told the story about Greta, a goblin who learns about the value of adorable Tea Dragons. I read this story while sitting at my family’s kitchen table, and I didn’t want it to end!

Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson. I didn’t get a chance to read this story in time, but I look forward to when I’m finished with my Lisa See book.

‘Small Country’ by Gael Faye/A Review

Small Country by Gael Faye
Translated by Sarah Ardizzone
Publisher: Hogarth Press
Length: 185 pages
Genre: Historical Fiction
Release Date: June 2018

I got my hands on Small Country as a Book of the Month selection for the month of May 2018. I was immediately intrigued by the story: a story that details the tragic events of the Rwandan genocide of the mid 90s through the eyes of a child. I immediately wanted to read it, yet one thing led to another (busy work schedule, other reading interests, etc.), and I didn’t picked it up until this week, when The Reading Rush readathon began. Once I did begin the novel, I finished it in a day.

     Small Country follows the life of Gabriel (Gaby), a 10 year old child living in an expatriate neighborhood in Burundi. A child of a French father and an Rwandan mother, Gaby lives in an area that faces intense political climates and ethnic hostilities between the Hutu and Tutsi citizens. These factors rest in the background at the beginning of the story, as Gaby lives with the daily struggles that encompass most children: Daily school life, forming close friendships, and connecting with close family. All of this changes as the community takes part in their first act of democracy in 1993, electing their first president. What follows next details the horrific events of assassination and genocide, leaving Gaby and his family struggling to live their daily life in an undeclared war zone.

     Gael Faye writes Small Country from his experiences growing up in an expatriate neighborhood in Burundi himself during the 90s. He deftly writes this debut novel in such an unflinching voice. He described Gaby as a young man struggling to keep his child-like innocence alive while the childhood of his friend evolves into a brotherhood of struggle. Gaby has the love of his sister and other friends in the community to maintain his spirit, yet it falls constantly at odds with the ever changing political climate, the mindset of his social circle shifting with the times.

     Small Country also speaks of the effects Western countries have on Burundi and Rwanda. Gabe’s parents deal with the differences between life in Burundi and the more relaxed atmosphere of France. Burundi and Rwanda are heavily influenced by French control, yet many of the native citizens are held under servitude. While Gaby and his friends are sheltered from the topic of slavery, his mother (who is of Rwandan decent) frequently reminds her children that their comfortable living is an exception to the norm.  

     Indeed, this book was difficult to read as it handles the topic of death through genocide. As the book progresses, it shifts to a darker view of life as entire neighborhoods and communities are wiped out solely based on their ethnic background. It follows the slow, negative progression of one person in their community as they search for loved ones within a war-torn neighborhood. The mental anguish described as they venture deeper into the unknown is absolutely chilling.

      I found Small Country to be a very fulfilling read. When I was done reading this story, I sat with it for a bit a took a deep breath. It’s truly heartbreaking that people can be singled out and murdered because they are a different ethnicity. The fact that such crimes are still committed this present day are equally saddening. We can only stay aware of these tragedies and be thankful that there are places where their voices can be heard.     

Rating: 4/5 Stars

The Reading Rush: Days 2 & 3

I’m currently visiting family in Northern NJ for a couple days, but I had time to get some reading in for The Reading Rush!

Yesterday I began the challenge of reading a book with at least 5 words on the cover. I chose ‘The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane’ by Lisa See. It centers around a family honoring deep rooted traditions within the Akha people, focusing on the deep bonds of a group of women within the community.

Today I fulfilled the challenge ‘Read a book with a non-human character in a lead role. I chose to read ‘The Tea Dragon Society’ by Katie O’ Neill. This is a graphic novel filled with adorable non-human characters, and lovable dragons with special abilities!

The Reading Rush Blog #1

For the first day of The Reading Rush, I decided to fulfill the challenge ‘Read a book that you meant to read last year’, and that book was ‘Small Country’ by Gael Faye. It tells the story of war and tragedy through the eyes of Gaby, a 10 year old boy living in an expatriate neighborhood near Rwanda. It’s a short, yet powerful read as it confronts the reality of war and genocide in vivid detail. Thr book also has moments of innocence as Gaby and his younger sister attempt to live normal lives with their family and friends.

I’m glad that I finally picked up reading ‘Small Country’!